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News and Updates – FAA Issues Emergency Airworthiness Directive (EAD)

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an Emergency Airworthiness Directive (EAD) that requires operators to inspect fan blades on certain CFM56-7B engines within 20 days.

The directive is based on a CFM International Service Bulletin issued today and on information gathered from the investigation of Tuesdays Southwest Airlines engine failure. The inspection requirement applies to CFM56-7B engines. Specifically, engineswith more than30,000total cyclesfrom new must complete inspections within 20 days. The EAD becomes effective upon publication. The engine manufacturer estimates todays corrective action affects352 engines in the U.S. and 681 engines worldwide.

News and Updates – FAA Statement on Issuing Airworthiness Directive (AD)

The FAA will issue an Airworthiness Directive (AD) within the next two weeks that will require inspections of certain CFM56-7B engines. The directive will require an ultrasonic inspection of fan blades when they reach a certain number of takeoffs and landings. Any blades that fail the inspection will have to be replaced.

News and Updates – FAA Response to 60 Minutes Story of April 15, 2018

FAAs response to the 60 Minutes story (PDF) of April 15, 2018 includes:

  • Signed letter from Ali Bahrami, Associate Administrator, Aviation Safety
  • FAA Order 8000.373, FAA Compliance Philosophy
  • FAA Order 8000.72, FAA Integrated Oversight Philosophy

News and Updates – No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm

We have a sense of humor, too, but an April Fools joke that the Federal Aviation Administration is extending the ADS-B deadline is just that.

As stated in the final rule published with industry input in May 2010, all aircraft flying in designated controlled airspace generally the same busy airspace where transponders are currently required must be equipped with ADS-B Out avionics by Jan. 1, 2020. Only aircraft that fly in uncontrolled airspace, and aircraft without electrical systems, such as balloons and gliders, are exempt from the mandate.

Those who have already equipped understand that ADS-B is transforming the nations airspace by providing more precision and reliability than the current radar system, enhancing safety and increasing situational awareness.

Time is running out. There are only 21 months left until the deadline. If you have any questions about equipage whether you need to or not, what equipment to get, etc. please see the FAAs Equip ADS-B website. For information about the transformational technology, visit the ADS-B website.

News and Updates – Could You Be a LAANC Service Supplier?

The Federal Aviation Administration is looking for a few good suppliers for the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC), that is.

In October 2017, the FAA deployed LAANC (pronounced LANCE) at several air traffic facilities to evaluate how well the prototype system functioned for drone operators who want to fly in controlled airspace and for the facilities themselves.

The FAA is now considering agreements with additional entities to provide LAANC services. The period for new entities to apply will run from April 16 to May 16, 2018. Interested parties can find information on the application process here. This is not a standard government acquisition; there is no Screening Information Request (SIR) or Request for Proposal (RFP) related to this effort.

We want to enable technology and remove barriers so thats why were simplifying the authorization process, said FAA Acting Administrator Dan Elwell. If youre in the drone business, this is a great opportunity for you.

The agency is also planning a nationwide beta test that will roll out from April to September of this year, which will incrementally activate LAANC at nearly 300 air traffic facilities covering almost 500 airports.

LAANC uses airspace data includingUAS facility maps that show the maximum altitude around airports where the FAA may automatically authorize operations under Part 107. LAANC gives drone operators the ability to interact with industry developed applications and obtain near real-time authorization from the FAA. LAANC is a foundation for developing theUnmanned Aircraft Systems Traffic Management System (UTM).

The FAA expects LAANC will ultimately provide near real-time processing of airspace authorization and notification requests for Part 107 drone operators nationwide. The system is designed to automatically approve most requests to operate in specific areas of airspace below designated altitudes.