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News and Updates – FAA-EC Pact Paves the Way for Lower Costs for U.S. Manufacturers.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the European Commission (EC) have signed a decision that will pave the way to lower fees that the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) charges U.S. manufacturers to validate their design approvals.

The agreementcalled Bilateral Oversight Board Decision 0008 (BOB 0008)was formalized at the 17th Annual FAA-EASA International Safety Conference in Washington, DC.

The FAA and EASA have previously signed revisions to the Technical Implementation Procedures (TIP) to the U.S.-EU Aviation Safety Agreement that reduce the time and effort to validate design approvals. Following verification and confirmation, BOB 0008 allows further recognition of the reduced involvement of the validating authority and opens the door for lower fees charged by EASA. The agencies will also be able to approve basic aircraft type certifications with minimal scrutiny.

BOB8 is a further recognition that both the FAA and EASA fully subscribe to the philosophy that safety in todays global aviation market depends to a great extent on international partnerships between aviation regulators.

The FAA and EASA also expect to sign an update to the Validation Improvement Roadmap at the FAA-EASA Safety Conference. The roadmap helps guide further streamlining of validation approvals by allowing each side to optimize reliance on the others certification system and eliminate or reduce technical involvement.

News and Updates – FAA Commissions New Tower at Sarasota Airport

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) cut over to a new air traffic control tower at Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport early this morning. The new, 128 foot-tall tower will enable air traffic controllers to continue to provide the safest, most efficient service to flights at the busy Florida airport.

Air traffic controllers working in the 525 square-foot tower cab control flights up to 4,000 feet in altitude within a five-mile radius of SRQ; from five to 10 miles from the airport, they handle flights from 1,200 to 4,000 feet in altitude.

A total of 34 FAA employees work at the new facility, 20 in air traffic and 14 in technical operations, which maintains the FAA electronics equipment in the tower and on the airfield.

The FAA and the Sarasota Manatee Airport Authority (SMAA) built the new tower under a unique agreement. The FAA funded the new tower design, engineering and electronic equipment. Agency technicians and engineers installed the electronics and will maintain the equipment. SMAA funded, constructed and owns the new tower. SMAA will maintain the facility, which includes a 9,000 square foot base building that houses equipment, administrative offices and training rooms.

The FAA and SMAA officially will dedicate the new facility in mid-September.

News and Updates – Want to be a Controller at the New York TRACON?

The Federal Aviation Administration is accepting applications beginning June 19 through June 26 from people interested in becoming air traffic controllers at the New York Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) facility in Westbury, N.Y.

The is open only to applicants who live within a 50-mile radius of Westbury. They must be U.S. citizens, speak English clearly, and be no older than 30 years of age (with limited exceptions). Applicants must have a combination of three years of education and/or work experience. They must also pass a medical examination, security investigation and FAA air traffic pre-employment tests.

Accepted applicants will be trained at the FAA Academy in Oklahoma City, Okla.

The New York TRACON manages aircraft flying to, from and over the New York metropolitan area, including the three major airports John F. Kennedy International, LaGuardia and Newark Liberty International as well as Teterboro and Long Island MacArthur.

Active duty military members must provide documentation certifying that they expect to be discharged or released from active duty under honorable conditions no later than 120 days after the date the documentation is signed.

Interested applicants should visitwww.usajobs.govto start building their applications orwww.faa.gov/Jobsfor more information about air traffic controllers.

News and Updates – FAA Publishes Means to Comply with Part 23

Last August, the final rule overhauling the Part 23 airworthiness standards for general aviation airplanes officially went into effect. Now, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued 63 means of compliance (MOCs) for Part 23 that will foster faster installation of innovative, safety-enhancing technologies into small airplanes, while reducing costs for the aviation industry.

On May 11, the FAA published a notice of availability in the Federal Register accepting 63 MOCs to Part 23 that are based on consensus standards published by ASTM International. The MOCs listed in the notice are an acceptable means, but not the only means, to comply with the applicable regulations in Part 23, amendment 23-64, for normal category airplanes. The public comment period ends July 10.

The FAA participated with industry and other stakeholders in developing these consensus standards. The agency accepted 46 of the ASTM consensus standards as MOCs without change; the other 17 MOCs are a combination of the ASTM standards and FAA changes.

Accepting MOCsbased on consensus standardsto Part 23, amendment 23-64, is consistent with the Small Airplane Revitalization Act of 2013 and the FAAs stated intent in issuing the overhauled airworthiness rules

A summary of MOCs accepted by this notice is available on the FAA website. Guidance for proposing additional means of compliance to Part 23 for FAA acceptance is provided in Advisory Circular 23.2010-1.

News and Updates – FAA Establishes Restrictions on Drone Operations over DOJ and USCG Facilities

At the request of federal security partners, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been using its existing authority under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) 99.7 Special Security Instructions to address concerns about drone operations over national security sensitive facilities by establishing temporary Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) specific flight restrictions.

Information on the FAA Notice to Airmen (NOTAM), which defines these restrictions, and all of the currently covered locations, can be found on our website.To ensure the public is aware of these restricted locations, this FAA website also provides an interactive map, downloadable geospatial data, and other important details. A link to these restrictions is also included in the FAAs B4UFLYmobile app.

Additional, broader information regarding flying drones in the National Airspace System, including frequently asked questions, is available on the FAAs UAS website.

In cooperation with Department of Justice (DOJ) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the FAA is establishing additional restrictions on drone flights up to 400 feet within the lateral boundaries of the following federal facilities:

  • United States Penitentiary (USP) Tucson near Tucson, AZ
  • USP Atwater near Atwater, CA
  • USP Victorville near Victorville, CA
  • USP Florence High near Florence, CO
  • USP Florence ADMAX near Florence, CO
  • USP Coleman I near Sumterville, FL
  • USP Coleman II near Sumterville, FL
  • USP Marion near Marion, IL
  • USP Terre Haute near Terre Haute, IN
  • USP Big Sandy near Inez, KY
  • USP McCreary near Pine Knot, KY
  • USP Pollock near Pollock, LA
  • USP Yazoo City near Yazoo City, MS
  • USP Allenwood near Allenwood, PA
  • USP Canaan near Waymart, PA
  • USP Lewisburg near Lewisburg, PA
  • USP Beaumont near Beaumont, TX
  • USP Lee near Pennington Gap, VA
  • USP Hazelton near Bruceton Mills, WV
  • United States Coast Guard (USCG) Baltimore Yard, MD
  • USCG Base Boston, MA
  • USCG Base Alameda, CA
  • USCG Base Los Angeles/Long Beach (LALB), CA
  • USCG Base Elizabeth City, NC
  • USCG Base Kodiak, AK
  • USCG Base Miami, FL
  • USCG Base Portsmouth, VA
  • USCG Base Seattle, WA
  • USCG Operations System Center (OSC) near Martinsburg, WV

These changes, which have been highlighted by FAA NOTAM FDC 8/8653, are pending until they become effective on June 20. Note that there are only a few exceptions that permit drone flights within these restrictions, and they must be coordinated with the individual facility and/or the FAA.

FDC 8/8653 FDC SECURITY SPECIAL SECURITY INSTRUCTIONS (SSI) PERTAINING TO UNMANNED ACFT SYSTEM (UAS) OPS OVER MULTIPLE LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE. THIS NOTAM SUPPLEMENTS FDC 7/7282, AND DESCRIBES THE CHANGES MADE TO THE UAS-SPECIFIC SSI AIRSPACE DEFINED BY FDC 7/7282 AND IMPLEMENTED PURSUANT TO 14 C.F.R. 99.7 FOR NATIONAL SECURITY SENSITIVE LOCATIONS. THESE CHANGES INCLUDE ADDITIONAL LOCATIONS REQUESTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE AND DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY. THE UPDATED LIST OF AFFECTED AIRSPACE AND ASSOCIATED PROTECTED LOCATIONS, AND OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION ARE PROVIDED AT THE FOLLOWING FAA WEBSITE: HTTP://UAS.FAA.OPENDATA.ARCGIS.COM.

SEE FDC 7/7282 FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION ON THESE SPECIAL SECURITY INSTRUCTIONS. 1806060400-1806200359

This is the first time the Agency has placed specific flight restrictions for unmanned aircraft, or drones, over Federal Bureau of Prisons and US Coast Guard facilities. The FAA has placed similar flight restrictions over military installations that remain in place, as well as over ten Department of Interior facilities and seven Department of Energy facilities.

Operators who violate the flight restrictions may be subject to enforcement action, including potential civil penalties and criminal charges.

The FAA is continuing to consider additional requests by eligible federal security agencies for UAS-specific flight restrictions using the agencys 99.7 authority as they are received. Additional changes to these restrictions will be announced by the FAA as appropriate.